No joke, Blizzard actively censoring discussion of the high amount of duplicates from Un’Goro card packs

Via Hearthstone: http://ift.tt/2oJhhCm


Well, this is crazy.

I hit the official Blizzard forums to ask what was going on with the high number of duplicate cards I was getting from the Un’Goro card packs, because I kept getting the Volcanosaur card every 3 or 4 packs fairly consistently.

In the grand scheme of things, it didn’t bother me that much because I can always just collect the dust. However, I figured I would report it and get some sort of official response, which could have been as simple as, "Just bad luck I guess shrugs".

I was just looking for some confirmation that this isn’t something that is known that they are working on, so I didn’t devalue my other packs by opening them now if there was a known problem. No whining, no requests for free card packs, no insults or anger, just genuine curiosity.

Well get this.. every time I posted the text below it has been deleted from the Blizzard forums:

Title: Journey to Un'Goro Pack Bug? Howdy all, I have opened 20 of the 50 packs from the Un'goro prepurchase this afternoon and already collected 6 duplicates of the Volcanosaur card - http://ift.tt/2oGulIF. Getting the same rare Volcanosaur every 1 in 4 packs is strangely reminiscent of the tri-class card pack issue with Mean Streets of Gadgetzan. To make sure I wasn't just seeing things, I did some math to calculate what the odds would be of getting the same rare every 4 packs. The probability P of getting at least one of a certain card from opening N packs, where m is the number of cards with the same rarity as the desired card and r is the average pack distance between cards of the desired rarity (r=0.88 for rares), is: P = 1 - ((r*m-1)/(r*m))^N For a longer explanation of the math see here: http://ift.tt/2p7jN1z Un'Goro has 36 unique rares (m=36) and I opened roughly 20 packs and discovered the same rare every 3 to 4 packs (N=4, note: the real N is 20/6 = 3.333... so I'm being generous here rounding up to 4). That means the chance of getting a single desired rare in 4 packs is: 1 - ((.88*36-1) / (.88*36))^4 = 0.12 or ~12%. You can check the numbers for yourself using Wolfram Alpha. http://ift.tt/2oGvobJ Now we can ask the question what would be the odds of doing this every other consecutive 4 packs back to back. Put another way, what are the chances of winning 12% odds 4 times in a row? 12% multiplied by itself 4 times gives us 0.02% odds of this happening. This is effectively 1 in 5,000 odds to get the same rare card every 4 packs or 1 in 10,000 for every 3 packs. I find it curious that the Volcanosaur given away yesterday is showing up so frequently today in the preorder packs. If it were any other card I wouldn't have bothered to look more closely. Perhaps it is a bug from yesterday's daily quest? Something seems off here. Any ideas or just bad luck? 

I can’t imagine for the life of me why this would be repeatedly deleted.

What gives?

submitted by /u/xtraeme
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Un’Goro Buyer’s Guide: How Many Packs Do I Have to Buy? (US and EU)

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Introduction

Blizzard recently announced the new priced for the EU region for PC, Mac and Android. Now, packs are equally priced throughout all platforms. Priorly, pricing on iOS systems was around 10% higher than on the other three operating systems. This development and the new expansion’s imminent release drove me to recalculate prices to write an updated “Buyer’s Guide” for the Journey to Un’Goro.

Important note: The article is written with forming a competitively viable collection in mind that will enable you to compete in tournaments and build ALL meta relevant decks – not just one or two. If you are aiming to just create a few ladder viable decks, the amount of money you have to spend will significantly lower than what I proclaim in this article!

beardo

Basics

Discounts on Packs

You can buy packs either directly from Blizzard via the game client on PC and Mac, or on iOS and Android devices which have their distinct stores in place. Discounts for the 60 packs bundle is exclusive to PC/Mac. On Android devices, you have the option to by Amazon Coins at a discount the more you buy. On iOS (iPhone/iPad), you can sometimes grab reduced iTunes gift cards with a saving of up to 20% (rarely more). Apple sells packs generally with a 10% higher price in the US which should be included in the calculation when buying via iOS devices. With the recent price increases in the EU region, all platform are priced equally in Europe.

A detailed guide to why buying with Amazon Coins is good value in the US can be read here. Keep in mind, that for the EU region this calculation may not be up to date anymore. Depending on the discounts you get for iTunes gift cards, buying on iOS may be equally attractive compared to Amazon Coins in Europe. Atop, discounts of Amazon Coins in Europe different to those in the US with lower discounts for smaller amounts of coins (compare Figures 1a and 1b). I made the math myself for individual pack prices which can be found below in the ‘How Much Is A Pack Worth – Money’ paragraph further below.

amazon-coins

Figure 1a: Amazon Coins savings, US store.

Amazon Coins Price [Euro] (discount)
500 4.90   (-2%)
1.000 9.70   (-3%)
2.500 24.00   (-4%)
5.000 46.00   (-8%)
10.000 78.00 (-22%)
50.000 375.00 (-25%)

Figure 1b: Amazon Coins savings, EU (€) store

amazon-meanstreets-ad

Rarity Distribution

Legendary cards render acquiring a complete collection expensive and Epics do this to a smaller extent. If we compare Arcane Dust (AC) cost for each rarity slots, the difference becomes apparent. On the one hand, AC cost of all Legendaries is almost as high as for all other cards in the set. If we sum up the dust value for Epics and Legendaries, the amount needed is more than  5-fold compared to all Rares and Commons. On the other side, Commons and Rares account for more about two-thirds of the whole set (compare Table 1), not taking into account that Legendaries are non-duplicates.

Table 1: Card count in MSG vs. dust cost.

Table 1: Card count in MSG vs. dust cost.

Figure 2: Comparison of relative rarities in all Hearthstone expansions. The distribution in between the sets is almost identical. TGT and MSG share the same numbers.

Figure 2: Comparison of relative rarities in all Hearthstone expansions. The distribution in between the sets is almost identical. TGT and MSG share the same numbers.

Figures 3: comparison of relative absolute rarities in all Hearthstone expansions. Legendaries amount for 20 in all expansions while there are only minor variances in Commons, Epics, and Rares.

Figures 3: comparison of relative absolute rarities in all Hearthstone expansions. Legendaries amount for 20 in all expansions while there are only minor variances in Commons, Epics, and Rares.

Most importantly, if you are not a completionist, you do not need each and every Legendary. There were a lot of crappy subpar Legendaries released in the past expansions as well as a comparable number of “fun/tech” Legendaries that would not see any tournament play. The first category is 5-9 per set; the latter are 3-8 more. These counts signify that 8-16 of the 20 Legendaries per expansion already released are not needed to build the majority of ladder decks. This number significantly dropped with every expansion though and reached the lowest in Whispers of the Old Gods.
The same holds true for Epics. Unplayable Epics accounted for 5-6 so far and fun/fringe playable ones for 10-13; totaling up to 15-18 of non-necessary Epics for competitions. Atop, some Epics are only played as a ‘one of.’

So far, quests look attractive and a good number of the Legendary minions do too. Quest could inflate cost for the Journey to Un’Goro (JtUG) set to an even higher level we saw in Whispers of the Old Gods and Mean Streets of Gadgetzan which on their own were above those of previous sets due to better card design.

To conclude, for serious deckbuilding, we only needed approx. 45% of the Epics and about 40% (25-60%) of the Legendaries. Overall, the playable high cost cards increased with each expansion due to better design.  Anyway, not needing to craft the useless cards cuts costs by a huge margin if you just want to obtain meta-viable cards.

Chances to Draw Cards of A Certain Rarity

We know from this article the chances to draw cards of different rarities from a pack. I will quote most what you see below regarding draw probabilities from this article. Although the chances for Legendaries are at a mere 5.37% per pack and a 1.10% chance total, there is a pity timer that guarantees to draw one Legendary at least every 40 packs. Relevant probabilities are displayed in Table 2 for rarities and for golden cards compared to ragular ones in Table 3. For more information on the topic, please take the time and jump to the source article over at the Gamepedia Hearthstone Wiki.

Table 2: Probabilities to draw cards of different rarities out of a Hearthstone pack. Included studies: Steve Marinconz (June 2014), E. R. Kjellgren (August 2014), Amaz (February 2015), HearthSim (August 2015). Total sample size of 27,868 card packs with 139,340 cards in total.

Table 2: Probabilities to draw cards of different rarities out of a Hearthstone pack. Included studies: Steve Marinconz (June 2014), E. R. Kjellgren (August 2014), Amaz (February 2015), HearthSim (August 2015). Total sample size of 27,868 card packs with 139,340 cards in total.

fullsizerender2

Table 3: Probabilities to draw golden compared regular cards. Note: data for golden cards gathered before TGT showed significant differences from later expansions. For this reason, the information is from the HearthSim study only: HearthSim (August 2015) which included 15,109 packs.

How Much Is A Pack Worth

Arcane Dust (AD)

There is a very thorough study on that topic. TLDR: A single card has a mean value of 19.65 arcane dust and a pack 98.25 AD respectively; taken into account, that you do not disenchant every single card. If you would do so, the value would rise to 108 AD per pack.

Gold

100 Gold per pack, no discounts, no nothing.

Money

US Region ($)

A pack costs in between $1.495 and $1.167 if bought on the desktop client (PC or Mac) depending on the bundle you choose. The 60 pack offer is for PC/Mac only and not available on any other platform. The pre-purchase (buyable only once) is also PC exclusive and cost $49.99 for 50 packs ($1.00/pack). Other discounts can be applied to this reduced price.
If you buy the biggest bundle of 40 packs with Amazon Coins (AC) at a 21% discount (10000 AC; $79), the price per pack drops to $0.988. It is worthy to note that this is without counting for coin rewards, which sadly are not available in the EU region. If you are insane enough to invest for the full 25% cost reduction (50,000 AC; $375) costs are down to $0.938/pack. If you compare that to the 50 packs of the pre-purchase these, cost $0.999 each.
Buying packs on iOS are the most expensive option even if you can grab a 20% discount on iTunes gift cards because all bundle prices are 10% higher on iPad or iPhone.

Conclusion: The PC/Mac client remains the most expensive option, even for the 60 pack bundle. Buying packs with Amazon Coins on Android devices or an emulator is the cheapest way to obtain packs in the US with as low as $0.94. Using these kind of advantages to result in prices even up to 6% cheaper than buying the pre-purchase bundle, but only if you do not buy this with AC also. The pre-purchase bought with AC is the overall best option.

EU Region (calculated in Euro because this is the biggest market)

Buying the 60 pack bundle on the PC/Mac Client costs €69.99 resulting in a €1.167 price per pack. The pre-purchase is still €44.99, this devided by 50 packs results in €0.899/pack (!). This one time offer can even be reduced by up to 25% if you buy it with Amazon Coins setting in to as low as 0.675€/pack.
Android offers up to 25% discount in the EU too if you buy 50000 AC for €375 giving you an individual pack price of €0.938. Buying 10000 AC will get you a 20% discount resulting in a total of €80 or €1 flat.
Raw prices on iOS are now the same in the EU region. It comes down to the amount of discount you are able to get from promotions to be comparable to Android. You will be able to grab those around festive days regularly with discounts raging in between 5-25% with 10-20% being the usual. Generally, if you have the liberty of choice regarding the platform, iTunes gift card promotions are better for investemnts of less than 100€ and starting that threshhold, Amazon Coins are most likely the better deal.

Conclusion: In EU region, Amazon Coins and iTunes promotions may result in the same price, depending on the amount of money you are willing to invest at a time or the availability of iTunes gift card promotions with the lowest price being€0.94. The more comfortable option seems to be AC because the discounts are present always. Atop, new customers may grab an additional discount e.g. saving another 15€ (expample).

The Un’Goro pre-purchase offer is best in EU/US, but is only buyable once. For all our readers from the United Kingdom, the same applies for you with the exception that AC have a maximum of 20% discount.


Ok, with all that out of the way, let’s get back to the initial question.

How Many Packs Do I Have To Buy?

To answer this question, you have to know first what you want to get as a result. Do you want a full collection with all cards, only cards that you need for being competitive on the ladder or something in between? Therefore I constructed four scenarios with the fourth being listed more for fun. Tbh, there are only a handful of people willing to spend thousands of  in cards, right? All these assume that you have no Gold and Arcane Dust left.

Scenario 1: competitive only
You only want to all play ladder/tournament viable decks – not just a single one but all tier 1 and 2 decks to be able to participate in tournaments. Therefore you need max. 60% of all Epics and 50% of the Legendaries*. For Epics the number is kept that low as you will play some Epics only as single copies in a deck. You will obtain all Commons and Rares, though. You have no interest in golden cards. Because of the studies mentioned above, dusting crap Legendaries, etc. is not accounted for. I assume that you get some you some you want and some you don’t. Therefore I apply a penalty of 5% to the “needed” cards accounting for additional crafting atop of dusting the worthless cards. Packs are bought the cheapest way possible (see above paragraph) by spending pre-purchased Amazon Coins in the appropriate chunks.

*Clarification: This number seems high at first glance but I think the new set has a lot of potential and even more playable cards than WotOG and MSoG. For just one or two tier one decks this number is lower by a huge margin. You can check out figures 4-6 to determine your sweet spot.

Scenario 2: competitive and fun, no crap
All the above mentioned but you also want the playable, fun Legendaries and Epics resulting in 75% Epics/Legendaries needed.

Scenario 3: completionist (non-golden)
You want it all. Every single card matters and is worth trying out. These cards can be either golden or non-golden.

Scenario 4: completionist (golden)
You want every single card all in shiny gold disregarding that you may spend a fortune obtaining them. Probably, if you are even considering this path, money isn’t an issue for you.

Crafting Strategy

According to an article of PCGamer, the average result from the pre-order will give you 91 Commons (93% of all Commons), 46 Rares (64%), 11 Epics (20%) and 3 Legendaries (15%). This amount is not enough for all the scenarios we painted. There are two studies that try to answer the exact question this article asks. One for Whisper of the Old Gods (Old Gods study) and the other for The Grand Tournament (TGT study). Rarity distributions in between Old Gods and TGT compared to JtUG are not totally equal but in the bigger picture both studies deliver a more than acceptable approximation.

The Old Gods study gives an exact value of a mean of 380.453 packs for 100% completion of your collection with a minimum of 258 packs and a maximum of 507 in 10,000 runs performed in this simulation. There are some not so slight nuances regarding the strategy of HOW to obtain those cards. For this, let’s take a look at the TGT study: Will you complete your collection by investing the dust in missing Commons or Rares first or do you start at the top end with Legendaries? In the case you plan to get >100 packs, the recommendation is to start with the precious orange crystals first to get the most value out of every single booster opened. With an investment of 150-200 packs you will most likely get all Commons and Rares anyway. The argument behind this strategy is mainly drawn from the three figures below (Figures 4-6) which belong to the TGT Study.

Figure 4: Completion by starting with Commons

Figure 4: Completion by starting with Commons

Figure 5: Completion by starting with Rares and skipping Commons

Figure 5: Completion by starting with Rares and skipping Commons

Figure 6: Completion by starting with Legendaries.

Figure 6: Completion by starting with Legendaries.

Percentage-wise, you will complete your collection faster up to a certain point by starting with Commons because the Legendaries account for very few cards. By doing so, you will have to dust more cards reducing the overall value. Figure 7 shows an accumulated graph of completion for all rarities combined depending on crafting strategies. In the end, the difference will be just a few packs, but why waste any value if you are aiming for a ≥ 70% collection.

Figure 7: Completion strategy comparison Commons vs Legendaries first.

Figure 7: Completion strategy comparison Commons vs Legendaries first.

Brute forcing the completion of the set is not a good idea, meaning not dusting any card and just waiting until you get all cards. Completing the set will take >1000 packs in comparison to approx. 380 boosters when dusting unnecessary copies (compare Figure 8).

img_2871

Figure 8: Comparison of completing the set with and without the use of arcane dust.

Conclusion

Finally! We now have al prerequisitess to the answer the question of how much you and I should invest for each stereotype proposed. I mainly base the statements on Figure 6 out of the TGT study. In the costs listed, I choose the most reasonable way with as little as possible overinvestment, e.g. For scenario 1, we buy the pre-purchase and 3 times 40 packs with an additional 7 packs (total of 177), all with amazon coins.

Scenario 1: competitive only: 175 packs on average
US: $166
EU: €154

Scenario 2: competitive and fun, no crap: 240 packs packs on average
US: $237
EU: €211

Scenario 3: completionist (non golden):380 packs packs on average
US: $375 (approx. 3500 Amazon coins left if bought with the 50.000 AC bundle)
EU: €375 (approx. 8000 Amazon coins left)

Scenario 4: completionist (golden): approx. 1,000 Packs
US: $940
EU: €845
Note: Brute forcing 155,600 dust for all golden cards would cost you 1,440.74 packs.

In 1,000 packs you can only expect 3.5 golden Legendaries and 9.5 golden Epics, therefore crafting most of it seems the only valid strategy of obtaining a full golden set – which very few will ever do (compare Tab.4).

golden

Table 4: Chances to get at least one golden card off a pack. Percentages sorted by rarity and total.

Finally, are you interested in a mere “I will get x% of my collection done by y number of packs? Below, you can find the average number of packs you have to invest for the given percentage of the set (according to the TGT study; also compare fig.7+8):

  • 50 packs ≈   50% complete
  • 100 packs ≈ 75%
  • 150 packs ≈ 85%
  • 200 packs ≈ 90%
  • 380 packs ≈ 100%

Final Thoughts

(thanks for the huge number of comments on Reddit on my last article related to MSoG)

In order to just successfully play the ladder, less than the above mentioned 175 packs are needed because you will need only 1-3 viable laddeer decks. 50(-100) packs is a perfect start for everyone not playing tournaments regulary. In most cases this means buying the 50 pre-purchase boosters and dumping the Gold amassed over the last weeks in additional packs is enough, but only if the Gold was not spend during the heroic tavern brawl ? . This way, investment decreases significantly from the “shocking” prices mentioned above.

This concludes my article. I hope I saved you some money. If so, I would be happy if you could spread the word to other players of our community. As always,  please comment below or tweet me @OtakuMZ1978 .

Yours,

OtakuMZ

blingtron

Quick Brews: Control Dragon Priest (with Shadow Visions)

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Introduction


In the Quick Brews series, I’ll make a single pre-release deck for each class and talk a bit about it. However, since it’s impossible to tell how the new meta will look like, those might not be the best lists or they might not even work at all. And so, I don’t recommend crafting the cards Day 1 – you should probably wait and see how the meta turns out!

Second deck I want to talk about is the new approach to Dragon Priest. Most of people think that the deck is dead – but is it?

Control Dragon Priest


Most of people think that Dragon Priest is dead and focus completely on the Quest – Deathrattle Priest. However, I don’t really like it. I feel like the new Priest Quest doesn’t do enough to justify running it. The reward is probably the worst of them all. While yeah, getting up to 40 Health is great, it’s not a finisher. It can’t win you the game by itself. The deck relies too much on N’Zoth, the Corruptor and it feels like once N’Zoth turn is answered, it loses most of its power. Amara seem to be good only against the faster Midrange decks, where you’re under the pressure, but you won’t hopefully die until you finish the Quest. If those decks rule, then yeah, the Deathrattle Build will likely be better. But we’ll see.

However, I think that Dragon Priest has potential, with a big different approach. Instead of being a tempo deck that use Dragons and Dragon synergies to play powerful stuff on the curve, this one would be more of a Control/value deck. Some of the Dragon cards offer insane value. Drakonid Operative is a center of the deck – it’s a big body with an insane effect. However, it needs other Dragons to be viable. But that’s not a problem if you think about it. The deck runs 8 Dragons in total, which was enough for the Reno Dragon Priest to work and consistently activate Dragon synergies. Plus with 2x Netherspite Historian, there are even more potential Dragons. Book Wyrm is another incredibly powerful tool in such a deck – the card fits Control game plan much more than it fits the Dragon one.

The deck doesn’t look late game heavy, but it can generate TONS of value from outside of the deck. 2x Historian is 2 extra, most likely big Dragons (most of the small stuff rotates out, so you’re almost guaranteed to get a big guy). 2x Operative and 2x Thoughtsteal are 6 extra cards pulled out from the opponent’s deck. If you need even more value, Shadow Visions has a solid chance to pull out another copy of Thoughtsteal (or let’s say a big removal if you need one). Ysera is also a big threat that’s generating more and more value over time.

The deck would play much more like the old Control Priest lists, for example those from around LoE. The deck has no clear “win condition”, like a big combo, but instead it just slowly outvalues the opponent.

In case of a more aggressive meta, it can also be optimized and teched against Aggro. Adding Wild Pyromancer can be source of cheap, early AoE – that was always a common way for Priest to beat faster decks. Another card that goes well with Pyro is Binding Heal. Not only you can heal up your damaged minion, activate the 1 damage AoE, but you also heal your face for 5. It’s a really powerful combo.

In case of a faster or even more Midrange meta, Thoughtsteal can be switched out to Curious Glimmerroot. I actually thought about playing it right away, but it might not be a good idea. Early in the expansion people will try all sorts of weird stuff, so guessing which card belongs to the deck before the meta is stable will be very hard.

Kabal Songstealer is a tech card which I feel will be powerful. It’s one of the best Silence cards in the game, as it has nice stats for its mana cost (much better than Spellbreaker and Ironbeak Owl). Silence shapes up to be pretty alright this expansion, but if it won’t be, there are a lot of possible choices in that slot. Harrison Jones if weapon destruction will be necessary, Cabal Shadow Priest if some great targets pop out in the meta or even a second Holy Nova if you’ll need more AoE.

One thing that I’m afraid of when it comes to the Priest, and not this list – any slower Priest list – is that without a clear, solid win condition, the deck can not find a right place in the meta. For example, once Taunt Warrior finishes the Quest there is no way you’ll outvalue him – even if he doesn’t hit the right targets, he still either deals 8 damage to your Hero or kills something every tur and you can’t stop that. Another example is the Jade Druid – it’s a slow, grindy, value-oriented list, it might just be straight up bad against Jade Druid, because it can’t really put tons of pressure like the tempo Dragon Priest deck did, and it can’t clear huge boards or outvalue Druid in the late game. I’m afraid that the Deathrattle Priest might suffer from the same problem. But we’ll see, it’s hard to say how the meta will look like right now.

Closing


Thanks for reading! Remember that those are still prototypes and they will first need to be tested on the ladder and optimized. I will test most of those decks on the first days of the expansion and I will write full guides for the ones that will turn out to be working properly.

Good luck on the ladder and until next time!

The post Quick Brews: Control Dragon Priest (with Shadow Visions) appeared first on Hearthstone Players.

Quick Brews: Taunt Control Warrior (With Fire Plume’s Heart)

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Introduction


In the Quick Brews series, I’ll make a single pre-release deck for each class and talk a bit about it. However, since it’s impossible to tell how the new meta will look like, those might not be the best lists or they might not even work at all. And so, I don’t recommend crafting the cards Day 1 – you should probably wait and see how the meta turns out!

Last brew is the Taunt Control Warrior deck. I’m having high hopes for it, as it should fare well in terms of survivability and it has insane win condition now.

Taunt Control Warrior


For a very long time, Taunt Warrior was like a joke deck. Blizzard has tried to push it nearly every expansion since TGT and it failed miserably. Running a bunch of Taunt minions without purpose turned out to not be strong enough (putting too many Taunts into your deck is actually a very common mistake among new players) and the “synergy” cards weren’t good enough to justify a deck full of Taunts. So in the end, the deck was surviving, not winning the game. Surviving is good enough against Aggro, but any slower matchup was butchering a concept of Taunt Warrior. The deck didn’t have a solid win condition… until now. Apparently, becoming Ragnaros is the best answers to those problems.

The main idea behind this deck is to put a wall long enough to finish the Quest. And after you finish the Quest, all you have to do is survive (by putting a bigger wall) and press Hero Power whenever you can. Fast matchups should be won by the sheer number of Taunts you’re running. If you play a Taunt every turn since turn 3 with an occasional AoE here and there, they will have a really hard time going through. Slow matchups should be won thanks to your Hero Power – imagine a Control mirror where one player has Ragnaros the Firelord on board that can’t be removed at all. The game is not going to end well for the second player. Control decks can’t flood the board to counter it and playing a single, bigger minion has a 50% chance to die every time.

One thing I’m afraid of, however, is how the deck will work against Midrange decks. I think that stuff like Midrange Hunter or Midrange Shaman might be really strong against it. They can get through the Taunts easier than Aggro decks can, but you might not have enough time to abuse your Rag Hero Power, not to mention that it’s much less effective against decks that can flood to a certain extent (and many Midrange decks can). That might be the bane of new Taunt Warrior, but it’s just a theory.

I’d like to talk a bit about card choices here. The deck runs 13 Taunts + 2 more from Discover + 2 more are shuffled into the deck. That should be enough to accomplish the Quest quite consistently before the very late game. One card that I think is particularly powerful in the list is Stonehill Defender. It’s a bit similar to Acolyte of Pain and that’s why it took its place in my list. Even though you don’t have a potential to cycle more than 1 card, the fact that you’re guaranteed 2 Taunts with a single card makes it a better choice than Acolyte in such a deck.

Why N’Zoth, the Corruptor? Because you can build a wall. You play “only” 4 Deathrattles in the deck, but each one of them is a Taunt. While summoning them again doesn’t count for the Quest, it’s still a very nice defense. Taunts are one of the best kind of minions you can bring up, because it turns N’Zoth into a “fast play” which opponent can’t simply ignore and go face. Even assuming that you get to play a single Infested Tauren and a single Direhorn Hatchling before turn 10, N’Zoth is already worth it. It brings enough value, it shuffles another Taunt into your deck, what more do you want? Well, I know that more – I actually wanted to play Cairne Bloodhoof in the deck, but I’ve figured out that it would be too slow. However, in case the meta will turn out to be slow, I think that Cairne will be a great choice.

King Mosh isn’t rated too highly, but I really like the card. In the late game it acts as a Brawl you always win with a big minion when you combine it with Whirlwind. It gives the deck another big board clear. Then, there is also The Curator – why? Because you’re nearly guaranteed to get a Beast (you run 3 of them) and you also have a solid chance to get Primordial Drake. It’s like guaranteed card draw with around 50/50 on the second one. And it’s a Taunt that will most likely draw more Taunts, so it adds to the Quest’s consistency.

I’ve heard some opinions that the deck should cut Shield Slam, but I disagree. It’s still a very powerful card until you finish your Quest – and after you finish it you’re fine with having a dead card. It’s still not completely dead, because you might have some Armor surplus or you can combo it with Shield Block.

Depending on the meta, the deck can be optimized one way or another. It’s very easy to make it slower, by adding some more N’Zoth targets, Gorehowl or let’s say a second Primordial Drake. It’s also easy to make it faster, by simply getting rid of some late game and adding more removals/early game or even the new 5 Armor for 1 mana card if the meta gets really fast somehow.

Overall I’m pretty optimistic about this deck, maybe not this exact list (I’m still on the edge about N’Zoth, the Corruptor pack) but after some optimization, Taunt Control Warrior might be a high tier deck.

Closing


Thanks for reading! Remember that those are still prototypes and they will first need to be tested on the ladder and optimized. I will test most of those decks on the first days of the expansion and I will write full guides for the ones that will turn out to be working properly.

Good luck on the ladder and until next time!

The post Quick Brews: Taunt Control Warrior (With Fire Plume’s Heart) appeared first on Hearthstone Players.

Quick Brews: Discard Zoo Warlock (Without Quest)

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Introduction


In the Quick Brews series, I’ll make a single pre-release deck for each class and talk a bit about it. However, since it’s impossible to tell how the new meta will look like, those might not be the best lists or they might not even work at all. And so, I don’t recommend crafting the cards Day 1 – you should probably wait and see how the meta turns out!

Second deck is what I think might be the most busted deck in the meta – a new version of Discard Warlock.

Discard Warlock


There is a lot of Aggro hate cards in this expansion. Anti-Pirate, anti-Weapon, Taunts… But at the same time we don’t get a lot of cards that counter Zoo. Well, Shaman might still be quite powerful against Zoo because of all the AoEs, you can’t have everything.

Why no Quest in the list? Because I honestly think that Warlock’s Quest is too slow to run in an aggressive Zoo list. I like the Quest and I will try to make it work, but in a slower, more Midrange version. That deck will be very experimental – but this one? I’m at least 90% certain that it will work.

Rotation hit Zoo a bit. The deck has lost Imp Gang Boss, which was one of the best 3-drops. It also lost Dark Peddler, which might not have been the best 2-drop, but it’s flexibility made it very powerful. However, the biggest loss is Power Overwhelming rotating into Hall of Fame. But after seeing the new Zoo tools I’m not even surprised by that rotation.

So, first of all, the new Legendary – Clutchmother Zavas. It’s obviously incredibly powerful. First, it will make your Discards more consistent. Before you had 2 targets you wanted to Discard – 2x Silverware Golem – now you have a third one. Second, that third discard target is sticky – you can hit it multiple times, potentially increasing your number of valid discard targets even more. Third, once you’re done with your Discarding you just play it as a huge 2-drop. Even after just a single Discard, it’s already 2 mana 4/4, which makes it a solid drop. But if you keep it for a while in your hand, you should be able to drop it as 6/6 or 8/8, for just 2 mana.

Then, the deck has got a new Egg. Nerubian Egg used to be a Zoo staple. While the Devilsaur Egg is a bit weaker, it’s still a very nice addition to such a list. Sadly, Power Overwhelming rotates out, but there are still tons of ways to activate it. Abusive Sergeant, Dire Wolf Alpha, Defender of Argus and most importantly . Not to mention that Egg just sitting there on the board is often a good thing in slower matchups. It makes it less vulnerable to AoE, because even if your opponent wipes the board, you’ll start with a 5/5.

But I feel like the MVP of the deck and a sleeper OP card of the expansion is . Adapting TWICE on a 4-drop is very powerful. While you won’t always hit the most optimal Adaptations, here are few examples of how the card can look like. It can be a 4 mana 7/7 with no Overload. 4 mana 4/7 Taunt or Divine Shield. 4 mana 4/4 with Divine Shield that summons 2x 1/1 on Deathrattle. 4 mana 4/10 (imagine following it up by Argus next turn – DIY Ancient of War in Zoo on turn 4 if you Coined it out). Or maybe even a 4 mana 7/4 that can’t be targeted by spells? (that can be insane in some slower matchups) With a lot of the Adapt options being viable, the card will be good most of the time. You have to get really unlucky to not hit anything good. And some sequences will be simply game-winning. Play turn 3 Devilsaur Egg, eat it and get a 4/10. End up with 4/10 and 5/5 on the board on turn 4 as a Zoo. Yeah.

The only concern might be not enough good targets to sacrifice. But that shouldn’t be a problem. With Devilsaur Egg, Forbidden Ritual, Abusive Sergeant, Possessed Villager or even a small drop that would die anyway on the board next turn, there should be plenty of targets to eat.

Also, what’s really cool about this deck is that it’s F2P players-friendly. You can play a budget list without Clutchmother Zavas and the only new cards from the latest expansion you have to put in the deck are Devilsaur Egg (Rare) and (Common). Of course Clutchmother can sometimes be a pretty, well, clutch card, but I think that playing the deck without her will be possible.

Also, if you want to play the anti-fun police, it should be a great deck to storm through the ladder on Day 1. Most of the players will start building their greedy Quest decks and this might be a good way to punish them until they optimize their builds.

Closing


Thanks for reading! Remember that those are still prototypes and they will first need to be tested on the ladder and optimized. I will test most of those decks on the first days of the expansion and I will write full guides for the ones that will turn out to be working properly.

Good luck on the ladder and until next time!

The post Quick Brews: Discard Zoo Warlock (Without Quest) appeared first on Hearthstone Players.

Quick Brews: Elemental Shaman

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Introduction


In the Quick Brews series, I’ll make a single pre-release deck for each class and talk a bit about it. However, since it’s impossible to tell how the new meta will look like, those might not be the best lists or they might not even work at all. And so, I don’t recommend crafting the cards Day 1 – you should probably wait and see how the meta turns out!

Today’s batch of theorycrafts is the last before expansion hits. I start with a rather straightforward deck which is an Elemental Shaman.

Elemental Shaman


Elemental mechanic reminds me a bit of Dragons. The goal of the deck is to curve out as well as possible. You aim to play a minion bigger and better than you should every turn and win the tempo game that way. With a good curve, which won’t be that hard to get, your turns 4 -> 8 should all be incredibly powerful.

The main problem with Shaman in the new expansion is early game that rotates out. The class loses Tunnel Trogg and Totem Golem, both of which were very powerful early game plays. To compensate for that, I’ve figured out that Elemental early game combos very well with Flametongue Totem. Small cards like Fire Fly or won’t be able to fight for the early board themselves, however if you toss in a Flametongue that’s another story. You can generate a bunch of small minions quite easily, making the Totem value high. And what if Totem dies? No problem, remember that your goal is to get to the mid game without falling behind, not to win the game with your small guys.

Mid game is where the deck really starts to shine. Starting with turn 4 – Tol’vir Stoneshaper. Psych-o-Tron is actually a decent card, just a bit short to being playable. And Tol’vir is a better version for 1 less mana. Taunt and Divine Shield combo really well, especially if you can also throw in a Flametongue Totem somewhere in the mix. The biggest problem with the card is that it’s not an Elemental itself, which ruins the curve. But that’s not necessarily the case. To fix that problem, the deck also runs – the card can get insanely strong in certain scenarios. You should be able to hit 3 or 4 Elementals quite consistently (because the deck runs 15 of them + 2 tokens + 2 more to Discover from Servant) which is like a mini-Emperor Thaurissan for Elementals. What is important, though, is that by reducing the cost of all the Elementals you can actually play a 1-drop Elemental (you have 4 in the deck + 2 tokens) alongside the Stoneshaper, because it will cost 0 – and now Stoneshaper won’t “ruin” your curve.

Glacial Shard might seem like a pretty weak minion, but I actually think that it might be one of the strongest Elementals in the expansion. Not only it’s a cheap way to activate the synergy, but freezing a minion is a good effect that scales with the game. The most powerful 1-drops are those who are useful beyond turn 1 and this is one of them. For example, if you Freeze a minion that directly threatens your Mana Tide Totem and thanks to that it goes off for another round, it’s like this card drew you an extra card. Maybe you don’t have a good way to kill a 5 health minion on the board, but next turn you can play Blazecaller? You can Freeze it and just destroy it next turn, no problem. Opponent has a weapon that cleanly kills your minion? You can freeze face and have that minion for one extra turn – maybe you’ll play a Taunt to protect it, maybe you will roll a Taunt/Healing totem etc. It’s just an effect that has multiple applications and doesn’t actually get useless later.

Another interesting card is Devolve. I put only a single one right now, but you might even run 2 of them depending on how the meta shapes. It might counter many decks like Buff Paladin (not only counters buffs, but also a Stealthed Galvadon), it completely destroys Druid’s Living Mana, it can somehow counter that N’Zoth, the Corruptor turn (you still need to deal with a big board, but at least they aren’t getting the Deathrattles value). Depending on how the meta shapes, the card can be a staple in every Shaman list.

But the MVP of the deck is obviously Kalimos, Primal Lord. It might be the best class Legendary in the whole expansion. Given that you will play Elementals nearly every turn, it’s not that hard to activate and it’s amazingly flexible. You can choose between flooding the board (which is another reason Flametongue might shine IF they don’t clear the board right away), dealing AoE damage, healing yourself and dealing face damage. The flexibility is what makes this card busted – it’s powerful in every matchup, unlike most of the high cost cards.

Servant of Kalimos also deserves a honorable mention. Remember that class cards have significantly higher offering rate (I think it was 4x) than neutral and Shaman has some solid Elementals. Especially in the late game, when you need more value, you will have a solid chance of discovering something like Earth Elemental, Fire Elemental, Stone Sentinel, Al’Akir the Windlord or even Kalimos, Primal Lord.

Closing


Thanks for reading! Remember that those are still prototypes and they will first need to be tested on the ladder and optimized. I will test most of those decks on the first days of the expansion and I will write full guides for the ones that will turn out to be working properly.

Good luck on the ladder and until next time!

The post Quick Brews: Elemental Shaman appeared first on Hearthstone Players.

Do Not Forget to Login Today – Golden Volcanosaur is Today’s Login Reward!

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This is your only chance to get a free Golden Volcanosaur from the Hearthstone Team! Make sure you login on all the servers you play Hearthstone on to get this free card.

5 cards from Hearthstone’s Journey to Un’Goro that might end up being broken – PC Gamer

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PC Gamer

5 cards from Hearthstone’s Journey to Un’Goro that might end up being broken
PC Gamer
Not wanting to be left out, I did my own alongside fellow Hearthstone Championship Tour casters Raven and That’sAdmirable , which you can watch in its full glory here . However, in the interests of those of you with slightly less than five hours to
Fireside Gatherings Changes, Un’Goro Reveals, Bans, and More ‘Hearthstone‘ Weekly News in ‘Touchstone’ #91Touch Arcade
Hearthstone: Journey to Un’Goro launches next weekPolygon
The prehistoric-themed ‘Journey to Un’Goro’ expansion for ‘Hearthstone‘ arrives April 6Digital Trends
GameSpot –PVP Live
all 48 news articles »

The Trump Theorycraft Train to Un’Goro

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The self-proclaimed Mayor of Value Town has created some interesting looking decks this past weekend, some of which deal with the upcoming Quest cards! Will you pilot any of them?

Top Decks of the Week for April 2

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The last week of Standard and Hearthstone as we know it for the Year of the Kraken and Mean Streets of Gadgetzan! Check out what decks made it to the top within.