I became the first legend player on EU this season by playing straight for 32 hours. Here’s how.

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Hey guys, JohnnyBlack here. Specifically, I played straight for 31 hours and 36 minutes. After sleeping for most of today and catching up on some non-HS related activities, I figured I’d post the two decks here with a discussion of the differences from the norm, and why they matter.

Proof

Victory Screen

32 Hour VOD

Quest Rogue

Decklist

AAECAaIHBLQBkbwChsICxscCDcQBnALtAp8DiAXUBYYJiq0CkrYC+L0Cl8EC/MEC68ICAA==

Burn Mage

Decklist

AAECAf0EBsUE7QTsB78IobcClscCDMABuwKVA6sElgX7DIGyAqO2Ate2Aum6AsHBApjEAgA=

I’ll split the discussion into 3 parts. The first two will be the sections on quest rogue and burn mage as it relates to the climb (I won’t reiterate all the analysis that’s already been done on these decks), and the third will be about how to actually play for 32 hours and keep your winrate positive. Feel free to read any or all of it.

Quest Rogue

In my opinion, there are 32 quality cards that quest rogue should run (my deck, +1 backstab +1 igneous). I could include my reasoning for why these 32 cards are better than wisp, tar creeper, doomsayer, stoneshaper, etc, but I’ll leave that for another discussion. Instead, I’ll talk about why I cut an igneous and a backstab.

Cutting 1 igneous elemental (credit to wabekaHS for suggesting this to me) is perfect, because you rarely ever want to draw two igneous elementals in the same game. In the same vein, it’s also a terrible mimic pod target. Igneous costs 3 mana for a 2/3 body, so it’s just too slow to play two of. In almost all matchpus, the quest rogue is staving off an onslaught of face damage while desperately trying to control the board until it plays the quest between turn 5-7 to quickly flip the board and win. In this plan, one 3 mana 2/3 that gives you 2 bodies with the same name is fine, but 2 is overkill. Therefore, igneous makes sense as a 1 of. (Also, you rarely ever do the quest on ingeous; I did it once in 200 games in which I was playing a 2-of).

Backstab make sense as the other cut candidate just because every other card has synergy with the quest. The reasonable quest minions need to be 2-of’s in order to add outs where you draw both copies, thus making the quest easier. Prep is amazing with the quest, and mimic pod and vanish synergize with it, so having those as 2-ofs increases prep’s consistency (although you could make an argument for 1 pod). Lastly, backstab is simply an anti-aggro-don’t-get-snowballed-on tech card. It doesn’t synergize with anything; it’s just there to aid you against cards like flametongue, enchanted raven, and vicous fledgling. Due to this, it’s benefit is significantly higher when using the first copy than the second, so it makes sense to run as a 1-of, too.

I can do a write-up on the ins and outs of quest rogue, some of the common pitfalls and strategies, as well as some of the basic fundamentals of pre and post quest play if you guys are interested, but I figure that’s probably been done pretty exhaustively.

Burn Mage

The burn mage list I use is pretty similar to most of them out there with 2 critical differences: 2 volcanic potion, 2 acolyte of pain, 0 kabal courier.

The volcanic potions were essential on this particular climb. In the beginning token druid was by far the most common deck I faced. I played at least 15 token druids before my first jade druid, and druid was by far the most common class I played against. Closer toward legend, the most common deck I played against was token bloodlust shaman with evolve. Against these two decks in particular, volcanic potion is extremely potent. In my last game (vs evolve shaman), I actually kept double volcanic potion and frostbolt in the mulligan. You can never have too much AoE clear against that token deck.

The most fundamental change I made is acolyte over kabal courier. This comes down to my contention that the cards in the deck are better than a random discovered mage, priest, or warlock card. For every game that you cheese out with a doom, or cabal shadowpriest, or extra healing card, there are two games you could have won by drawing your actual cards. For example, instead of getting a heal from courier, you can draw into your alex faster. All the cards in your deck work together. The burn cards allow you to go face, and are better in pairs. They are also great with alex. The board control cards help you clear, and often a two turn clear with potion and flamestrike can answer a board you’d otherwise lose to. Alex synergizes with block and barrier for defense, medivh wants you to have big spells in your hand for value, valet needs you to have a secret active. Your deck is a fine tuned combo machine teched to beat the meta. Why would you want a random decent card from some other class over a card from that well-oiled machine?

Additionally, because of your hero power, you almost always get at least 2 cards from acolyte. This means that you’re not choosing between a courier card and an acolyte card, but rather between a courier card and two acolyte cards (using some extra mana sometimes). Obviously, stating it like this assumes that the game isn’t going to fatigue. With this deck, almost every game you lose doesn’t involve fatigue. You get rushed down by aggro, killed by a midrange board you can’t handle, or run out of resources in your hand against control. Even when losing against control, your deck isn’t drained, you just run out of steam and eventually lose the board to big cards you can’t handle. The 2/2 body and 1/3 body are pretty similar, but even then I’d argue acolyte is better because of how people treat it. Ever seen somebody spend a turn using jade lighting on a courier? I didn’t think so (unless they had no other reasonable plays). People don’t want your hero power to turn into “draw a card”, so they use frostbolt, jade lighting, and weapon charges on acolyte to prevent it. Against shaman specifically, they MUST address it, or it will likely draw 3 cards and eat 2 or 3 small minions in the process.

P.S. Acolyte + volcanic potion is a nifty little draw 2 combo

Like with the quest rogue, I’d be happy to write up a guide for this burn mage, how to play against various things, how to decide between offensive and defensive alex, the kinds of game flow you see, etc. if you guys are interested.

Playing for 32 hours

If you want to grind to legend in one sitting, or even just play hearthstone for an extended period of time, the first thing you have to remember is to take care of your body. Drink. If you get to focused on the game, or tilted when you lose, it becomes very easy to forget this. I had a water bottle and a half-gallon of milk with me the entire time. I refilled them whenever they ran out so that I could absentmindedly take sips during down time. The milk is great because it provides a constant stream of calories in addition to hydration.

You can probably guess the next piece of advice already. Eat. During a 32 hour period, your body needs a lot of calories. Case in point: towards the beginning of the stream, I got stuck at rank 9 for literally 4 hours. Why? Because I started to get hungry, lost a few games, and wanted to keep playing. I kept playing, and not eating, and saying “after this game I’ll get food” for 4 painful hours of 50% winrate game play at rank 9 before I finally cracked and made myself some hotdogs. I quickly laddered to rank 5 after that. Also, don’t forget you need more than one meal in a day. When I got hungry again, I brought a box of mini-wheats up with me and ate those with the milk as my sustinence for the rest of the climb. I figured they’re pretty rich in carbs, and my brain would appreciate the energy when trying to navigate a complex dopplegangster-evolved board with my mage removal, or figure out which turn to vanish to barely survive and stabilize from there.

As a last quick note on the body, keep yourself moving around in your chair. I tweaked a muscle in my hip from sitting in one position for too many hours on end, and my quads were feeling a little strange at one point too. Also, take the headphones out occasionally and give your mind and ears a break from the game sounds. You can only hear “ice to meet you” “drink with me freind” “ice to meet you” so many times before you go crazy.

As for the actual game play, the key is conscious focus. Being good at Hearthstone is fundamentally about considering all your plays and then correctly picking the best one. It becomes difficult to do both of these when you’re exhausted. You need to consciously force yourself to look through your whole hand and consider every option each turn. Your tired brain will see one play that looks okay and want to just roll with it, but as we all know, the first play you see is often not the best one. Force yourself to ask the question “okay, what other options do I have?”. By consciously doing this, you can mitigate some of the tiredness. The tiredness sets your default mode from careful thinking to auto-pilot. It can be a little overwhelming to try to think through the thousand different ways you can send your removal at an evolved board over the next few turns when you’re running on 0 sleep, so if you feel overwhelmed just consider things until the rope, and then when it starts burning pick the best thing you can come up with. When you’re rested, you see things faster, but if you have discipline, even when exhausted you can still identify and analyze most of the lines available.

When you being to reason about a line of play, force yourself to defend it. And I mean actually defend it. I threw a game where I went face instead of trading and gave myself some nonsensical surface level justification for why it made sense based on certain topdecks, but if I’d just stopped to actually critique that justification for even 3 seconds I would have realized what I was saying sounded like it could be true, even though it wasn’t. Don’t just justify your plays to yourself, but actually think about if those justifications make sense. Again, your tired brain will be okay with any sort of pat, surface level explanation you can give it.

“Let’s trade so we don’t lose to bloodlust.”

Actual brain: “can you ever beat bloodlust? Aren’t you just going to lose to it next turn? What if we block and he pops it, is alex enough to win if he doesn’t have a second one? I feel like we’re pretty far ahead if he doesn’t have it, maybe we shouldn’t give that up.”

Tired brain: “k”

Force yourself to really think. The more tired you get, the harder it becomes, but by consciously making yourself defend the lines you pick, you can avoid some of the tired misplays that are responsible for your winrate falling.

Lastly, if you can, play a deck you have experience with. I played hundreds of games of quest rogue during season 1 of Un’goro and thus was very familiar with the kinds situations and game flows that you see. I understood the basic mechanics of using the quest, counting your mana over multiple turns, committing to brewing a certain minion, and min/maxing value post quest before I started the stream on May 31st. In contrast, I’d never played mage before the climb, because I thought all the random cards were so c a n c e r o u s (freakin auto-mod rules) I didn’t want to subject my opponent to that. Of course, I abandoned this notion when I realized mage was well suited against the meta I was facing, but that’s not the point. The point is that because all the situations I was seeing were new to me, my tired brain had to do a lot more work to analyze them. As I got more tired, it became difficult to win with the mage and the quest rogue had to pick up the slack. Luckily, after having played so many mage games during the climb, at the end, when I really needed the mage to carry me through the shamans, I was experienced enough to win. If I’d played those same games, at that level of fatigue, having had 10 games on the deck instead of 100, I would have probably lost.

So that’s it guys. After 32 long hours I became the first player this June to hit legend on EU. In case you’re wondering, this was really not a very efficient climb. The decks are decently complicated right now, and as a result it becomes difficult to keep the winrate up through 24 hours+ fatigue. Additionally, Blizzard now forces you to queue into someone with a rating a lot closer to yours than it had in the past. This leads, first, to you only facing the best players over and over who are also trying to get fast legend and thus tons of counter queueing (instead of someone who’s pretty good, but still like 7 ranks below you), and second, to upwards of 3 or 4 minute queue times. This was a pain; I probably spent at least 1 hour total of the stream simply staring at the queue screen. It doesn’t have to be a worthy opponent every time guys, just give me the really slow guy 🙂

Final record: 122-69 (63.8%)

Mage: 62-40 (61%) – overall the weaker deck, since I was worse with it, but carried me at the end; 5-0 in my last 5 with mage for the final push. Necessary because of all the counter queuing.

Rogue: 60-29 (67.4%) – overall the stronger deck, but got countered a little too hard by secret mage and evolve shaman, and also isn’t great vs token druid.

tl;dr – played 32 hours of quest rogue and burn mage to get first legend on EU by talking to myself and drinking milk

Shout out to the one guy playing renounce warlock at rank 8 (pretty early on, too). It felt like I was playing arena, except my deck had firelands portals and meteors and medivh, and you had random warrior cards. gg tho 🙂

Edit: For those commenting on the health risks, I forgot to mention I consumed a total of 0mg of caffeine during the stream. I would wager those random heart attack cases are more about the body’s reaction to various drugs and stimulants, as well as the unhealthy or a complete lack of food or hydration (or using the bathroom even) than they are about the actual sleep deprivation. Further, as strange as it sounds, lots of studies have been done on extended sleep deprivation and it has no real adverse effects. Prolonged chronic sleep deprivation does, but extended deprivation followed by catching up on sleep doesn’t. I think there was one guy they had take an aptitude test, kept him awake for a week, let him catch up, then take it again, and he scored the same. As a recent college grad I can tell you my body can handle 24+ hours awake pretty easily, and I can be high functioning mentally again in a day or 2.

As for the screen part, yes, I admit, it’s not great to stare at a screen (or sit, for that matter) for that long. The truth is just that I’m a new streamer and in order to attract attention I have to do things that no one else is willing to do. Why watch the guy with 4 viewers over someone with 2k? Well, this is a reason I guess 🙂 It’s the free market at work, forcing me to make my product exceptional at the beginning to attract attention in the market.

Top HearthPwn Standard and Wild Decks of the Week for June 4

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Journey to Ungoro Guide

Top HearthPwn Standard and Wild Decks of the Week for June 4

Top HearthPwn Standard and Wild Decks of the Week for June 4

Whaaat? No, we can’t be looking back at the top Standard and Wild decks of the week, not late on a Sunday evening. Your weekly decks, delivered below.


Top Standard Decks


Top Wild Decks

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Explaining a hidden and misunderstood keyword: “Return”, and it’s cousin “Shuffle”

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I would like to help spread awareness of a part of Hearthstone players don’t seem to get: "Return" is a keyword (or rather, should be), and has a specific meaning and rules. What has sparked my desire to make this post is the recent patch 8.2 where Pyros was fixed and no longer incorrectly works with Spirit Echoes. Since that patch several people have assumed that nothing was fixed with Pyros or that the resulting fix is actually a new bug, but Blizzard really DID fix an existing bug, people just don’t realize it because the rules haven’t been laid out to them.

"Return" is a simple concept: Move from point A to point B, with point A being "wherever the card happens to be but not point B" and point B being defined in the card text (usually to the hand). It gets VERY complicated quickly though, as there are hidden rules to it. Note that Return (as I define it, and how it works in-game) MOVES a card, and does not copy it. This is why Spirit Echoes can not stack, if you move a card from your field to your hand, it’s already in your hand and you can’t move it to your hand a 2nd time as it’s already there. Return also doesn’t care about the current status of the card, which means if you force a living minion to Return (like though a Hunter’s deathrattle trigger cards) it will leave the field instantly.

Now, as to what Blizzard fixed in the patch: Pyros is no longer compatible with Spirit Echoes. Why? Pyros Returns itself to your hand as a transformed card, and before the patch Spirit Echoes would Return a 2nd card of the Pyros that died to your hand. This is inconsistent with the "Return" keyword, which can’t make a 2nd copy of a card, and can only move the copy that existed. so Blizzard fixed it by making Pyros incompatible with Spirit Echoes, which is now consistent with how Return works in Hearthstone. Someone has also mentioned how Getaway Kodo won’t trigger on Skeleton Knight if he wins the joust, which is completely logical: If the card returns itself, it can’t re-return itself because it’s already there!

"Shuffle" is a similarly misunderstood card. Many players have tried to activate the Deathrattle of Malorne early to get extra copies, only to find their minion flying off into the deck. Well, Shuffle is essentially: Move this card directly into the deck, and then mix the cards. Now, that sounds obvious, but it’s important to note as it means you cannot stack this with Return, as the card can’t be in two places at once.

The confusion likely stems from the fact that "Return" and "Shuffle" are rare, and most cards have a different wording that isn’t so limited. Thistle Tea and Mimic Pod both add COPIES to your hand, for example, which gives a lot of players the idea that cards can be copied or duplicated at any time, even though that isn’t true in any case where "Return" or "Shuffle" is used. Many people have lost games due to the misconceptions of these "Should-be keywords", and I hope people can learn to check the wording on cards because they absolutely matter in these cases.

I’d love to here some better wordings or ideas on how to say this, if anyone has a better way to explain this concept. Blizzard can absolutely mess up, and this patch is full of bugs and oddities, but I want to give Blizzard props for fixing a bug that most people are treating as a NEW bug instead of a bug fix.

submitted by /u/thegooblop
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Keep your Account Secure with the Blizzard Authenticator

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Here at Blizzard we take account security seriously, which is why we recommend all accounts have an authenticator attached. Two-Factor Authentication such as this makes it much harder for someone to access your account as login required not only your password but a physical item such as a phone or a token. Having an authenticator has been proven to drastically increase account security; on top of that it can also make using online self-service account recovery a much smoother process.

While security is a serious issue we wanted to offer our community the most user friendly experience. This is why we introduced the One-Button Authenticator last year to our Blizzard Authenticator app:

Whenever* a log in attempt occurs on your account you will be notified via the app and prompted to Approve or Deny the request. You can also approve log in requests with notifications on your mobile or smartwatch without even opening the app! You can find out more about authenticators on our Battle.net Authenticator FAQ.

*Please note that by default you will only need to approve a log in attempt once a week per device. You can change this setting on your Battle.net Account Management page.

Journey to Un’Goro Deck Recommendations #6

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Introduction


It’s time for the sixth Journey to Un’Goro deck recommendations. A series where I share interesting and powerful decklists that had some success on the ladder. I won’t generally post a standard meta decks (you can find those easily anyway), but rather more off-meta decks. Lists that haven’t seen any play lately, decks with unexpected tech choices etc.

Un’Goro was released exactly 2 months ago. It’s hard to believe that we’re actually ~one month away from the next reveal season and ~2 months away from the expansion’s release. The Un’Goro meta still holds some surprises, as new decks are popping out every now and then. The strongest deck seem to be decided already, but that might not be entirely true – something might still shake up the meta a bit, like Token Shaman did lately.

All the decklists have been playtested by me – most likely either in Legend (mid-late season) or close to the Legend (early in the season). They were all working at the time I was writing this and in the meta I was playing, but I can’t assure that you’ll get similar results. Let’s start!

Feno’s Aggro/Token Druid


Feno’s Aggro/Token Druid
Class Cards (15)6140

2

Innervate

0

2

Enchanted Raven

1

2

Mark of the Lotus

1

2

Mark of Y’Shaarj

2

2

Power of the Wild

2

2

Savage Roar

3

Swipe

4

2

Living Mana

5

Neutral Cards (15)

2

Bloodsail Corsair

1

2

Fire Fly

1

Hungry Crab

1

Patches the Pirate

1

Dire Wolf Alpha

2

Golakka Crawler

2

2

Tar Creeper

3

2

Vicious Fledgling

3

Genzo, the Shark

4

2

Bittertide Hydra

5

Source

Token Druid (or Aggro Druid if you prefer to call it that way) is the most popular deck in the current meta. It’s still far, far from the Shamanstone times, because right now the most popular deck has ~10% representation on the ladder – the meta is incredibly close, but still, it’s hard to deny that the deck is powerful. While we’re at it, I’d like to note that with a few exceptions, the deck’s popularity is directly tied to how powerful it is. But as the popularity grows, the deck’s power goes down and vice versa. We’ve seen it already with a few decks in Un’Goro meta and it’s very interesting to watch. Deck gets powerful and people realize it -> more people start playing it -> the deck gets popular -> it actually gets weaker than it was. Why does that happen? Well, for two reasons mostly. First of all, stats are a bit skewed, because a lot of players who pick up the deck don’t play it as well as the more dedicated players who did before the deck was more popular. But second – if some deck gets popular, people find a way to counter it. Tech against it, play a deck that has good matchup against it. That dynamic is especially strong at the high ranks and in Legend – it also happens in lower ranks, but much slower.

But why am I talking about this right now? Because this build of Token Druid is pretty interesting. It’s nothing innovative, no, but one of the best ways to counter the counters is either to change the deck you play… or alter it. For example, Hungry Crab was an incredible tech in the meta. Not only it countered the Murloc Paladins, but also the Token Druid lists running Murloc package (so basically most of them). But this deck drops the Murloc package in favor of a few other cards. Now Hungry Crab tech is useless and the deck’s win rate has gone up. Even if this build is a bit weaker than the Murloc one in the vacuum (it’s hard to say honestly), it will be more successful in the meta where people tech against the Murlocs.

The non-Murloc builds are really interesting. First of all – Tar Creeper. People were afraid that this card will get into the Aggro decks and actually protect their small, but powerful minions instead of protecting people against them. And it’s kinda like that in case of this build. Token Druid is incredibly reliant on its board to snowball the game. If board doesn’t get answered, multiple AoE buffs will win the game very quickly. And Tar Creeper is there exactly to do that – prevent opponent from trading off the small minions. That 1/2 is normally an easy kill for a 2/3 minion, but not when it’s hidden behind a 3/5 Taunt. Yes, the card is not very good on the offense, but it gets significantly better when buffed. Just a single AoE buff makes it a 2/6 on the offense (so it starts to pack the punch) and 4/6 on the defense.

As for the other new additions, Genzo, the Shark. I’ll be honest that I’m still not convinced that this card is solid. But few things. First of all – this deck has no 4-drop and filling a turn 4 with something is sometimes very helpful (with strong turns 1-3 and 5, that lack of powerful turn 4 was sometimes showing – I often had to float some mana on t4). And since Token Druid gets out of cards very quickly, Genzo – as long as it connects – might save the day. Of course, “as long as it connects” is a pretty big requirement, that’s why the old Jeeves would be simply better. But you can’t always get what you want.

The list is much heavier with six 4+ mana cards instead of the standard three. But it actually makes it more powerful against some decks. Running out of steam was the main way to lose against decks like Burn Mage – if they’ve answered your early board you had no ways to refill. Topdecking something like a Bittertide Hydra instead of the 1-drop Crab is a huge difference. At the same time, with only 1 copy of each crab it relies more on the luck of the draw to counter the Murloc/Pirate matchups. That’s the price of consistency – tech cards are generally underpowered if you don’t hit anything, so removing them in favor of more all-around cards might be a good choice.

Token Druid is one of the best decks to climb the ladder with right now. Not only it’s strong, but the games with the deck are incredibly fast. It was my fastest deck last season with only ~3.7 minutes per game. Even if you count queue times and everything, that’s still less than 5 minutes per match.

Ostkaka’s N’Zoth Control Paladin


N’Zoth Control
Class Cards (16)11360

Forbidden Healing

0

2

Equality

2

2

Hydrologist

2

2

Aldor Peacekeeper

3

Rallying Blade

3

2

Consecration

4

Truesilver Champion

4

2

Spikeridged Steed

6

Sunkeeper Tarim

6

Ragnaros, Lightlord

8

Tirion Fordring

8

Neutral Cards (14)

Dirty Rat

2

2

Doomsayer

2

2

Wild Pyromancer

2

Acolyte of Pain

3

2

Stonehill Defender

3

Infested Tauren

4

Harrison Jones

5

Stampeding Kodo

5

The Curator

7

Primordial Drake

8

N’Zoth, the Corruptor

10

Source

I had a pleasure to play Control Paladin quite a lot last season. Not the N’Zoth version, the normal one, but I still loved it. It might be my favorite deck in the current meta. While I’ve always gravitated towards a more Midrange version of Paladin, I just dislike the Murloc package. It’s the best way to play the deck and they’re really strong, but I just don’t like playing the Murloc decks. That’s why Control Paladin is a much better choice for me.

It’s hard to say which version is better. I’ve heard voices saying that N’Zoth, the Corruptor is not good on the ladder – it’s simply redundant, there are almost no matchups where you need to resurrect your Deathrattles in the late game and that 10 mana card is dead most of the time. At the same time, N’Zoth in this list isn’t exactly a way to gain some crazy late game value, play it as a finisher when you’re nearly out of cards in the Control mirror. It’s more like a… second Tirion. That’s your only (well, besides Infested Tauren) resurrection target. After it dies, you pay 10 mana for a 5/7 + another Tirion. Great deal if you ask me. But it might be even better – thanks to the Stonehill Defender and Hydrologist (Getaway Kodo, Redemption), N’Zoth often ends up getting two or even three Tirions back.

On the one hand, after playing with the non-N’Zoth list, it’s true that a lot of the matchups simply are too fast and you’d rather play something else. But there are a few of them, like the mirror matchups or games vs Taunt Warrior, where more Tirions is a blessing. Those matchups are often won by simply smacking your opponent with the weapons repeatedly and having not one, but two 5/3 weapons is incredible.

When it comes to the rest of the deck, well, this list is very heavy on techs and one-ofs. If Reno Jackson was still in Standard I might even think about turning it into a Reno deck. The deck tries to get good matchups against as many meta decks as possible. It’s naturally good against Aggro because of all the board clears, Doomsayers, healing etc. Dirty Rat makes it better against Quest Rogue (which is usually a terrible matchup). Harrison Jones comes handy in a lot of matchups, but especially against other Paladins and Warriors. I also find Rallying Blade to be an interesting choice. I was always undervaluing the card in the lists that don’t run multiple Divine Shield minions. But that might be wrong. It’s like, every Hunter build runs Eaglehorn Bow even with no Secrets to back it up. A 3/2 weapon for 3 mana is balanced. They’re weak compared to Fiery War Axe, but FWA might be the most broken card in the game, so comparing anything to it will make it look bad.

Overall, if you like to play around with Control decks and your collection is quite big (because let’s be honest, those decks are EXPENSIVE), I recommend this deck or any other Control Paladin variant.

Viper94’s Jade Shaman


Jade Shaman
Class Cards (28)5780

2

Devolve

2

2

Jade Claws

2

2

Maelstrom Portal

2

2

Hex

3

2

Hot Spring Guardian

3

2

Lightning Storm

3

Mana Tide Totem

3

2

Spirit Echo

3

2

Jade Lightning

4

2

Jinyu Waterspeaker

4

2

Jade Spirit

4

2

Volcano

5

White Eyes

5

2

Thing From Below

6

Aya Blackpaw

6

Jade Chieftain

7

Neutral Cards (2)

2

Stonehill Defender

3

Source

Jade mechanic is still strong. Even though it’s not as popular as in Gadgetzan, Jade decks definitely can be played and can be successful. This is one of the examples. Even though Shaman didn’t get that much support this expansion, some of the cards were pretty useful.

Maybe let’s start with the only neutral card used by this deck (besides the tri-class Jade stuff) – Stonehill Defender. Shaman is probably the second strongest class to play this card in, right after Paladin. While the pool of neutral Taunts isn’t especially thrilling, Shaman is a class with a surprising amount of Taunts. A surprising amount of good Taunts. Hot Spring Guardian, White Eyes, Earth Elemental, Thing From Below and Al’Akir the Windlord. They’re not on the level of Tirion Fordring or Sunkeeper Tarim, but each one of them is quite powerful. We have healing, cheap (or free) 5/5, 5/5 that’s an investment into the future, because it Deathrattles into 10/10 in your deck, a huge 7/8 Taunt and a cherry on the top – a card with most keywords in the game (Taunt, Charge, Windfury, Divine Shield) that’s great if you manage to survive until turn 8.

When it comes to the Shaman card, Volcano is probably the best addition to any slow lists. The card is just incredibly versatile as a removal. It’s a bit like Meteor in the way that it can be used as both single target removal and AoE removal. It might be stronger in some situations (e.g. it can clear three 5 health minions, where Meteor can’t), but it also might be weaker (you can always pick the target with Meteor and on a big boards Volcano might miss and leave a big minion at 1 health or something). Either way, the card is so good that it’s often played over Elemental Destruction. While Ele Destruction comes earlier and is better at dealing with multiple mid-sized threats, Volcano is better against one or two big minions and it doesn’t have as much overload.

But a card that’s really cool in this deck in particular is Spirit Echo. Normally Jade Shaman is limited in the number of Jade cards it can play. The class has no Jade Idol so no way to go “infinite”. But Spirit Echo makes some of the Jade cards reusable. When playing in a slow matchup, where each extra Jade matters, getting another copy of Aya Blackpaw can be an instant win. But the card is much more versatile than that. If you get your Thing From Below to 0 mana (or at least close), you can add it to your Spirit Echo turn to create another 0 mana 5/5 Taunt when it dies on top of anything else you’re copying. Copying a Stonehill Defender is also a lot of value. I won some matchups against Aggro by simply Taunting up, playing Spirit Echo, then Taunting up again with the same things, then playing Spirit Echo again and stalling the game long enough until I draw healing or some AoE to clear the board. This tactic can be surprisingly effective.

Of course, the deck is not perfect. It’s still very slow and it takes a long while to snowball. In a lot of the games, especially against faster decks, ESPECIALLY against Quest Rogue, you will feel simply hopeless. But that’s the nature of Jade decks. Anyway, Viper94 has hit top 100 Legend with the deck, meaning that it should be at least viable enough to get you to Legend if you prefer to play the slow decks over Aggro.

Wild: Control’s Combo Priest


Combo Priest
Class Cards (24)2980

2

Circle of Healing

0

2

Inner Fire

1

2

Light of the Naaru

1

2

Northshire Cleric

1

Potion of Madness

1

2

Power Word: Shield

1

2

Divine Spirit

2

2

Radiant Elemental

2

Shadow Visions

2

Shadow Word: Pain

2

2

Kabal Talonpriest

3

2

Velen’s Chosen

3

2

Auchenai Soulpriest

4

Lyra the Sunshard

5

Neutral Cards (6)

2

Zombie Chow

1

Wild Pyromancer

2

Acolyte of Pain

3

2

Deathlord

3

Source

The Divine Spirit + Inner Fire combo became really popular in Journey to Un’Goro. It was always there, somewhere, played as an unexpected win condition from time to time, but right now it’s the main Priest win condition in Standard. It seems that the Wild meta has adapted that too. Combo Priest is getting pretty popular in Wild and for a good reason. The deck is really powerful.

While on the first glance it might not seem to have a big edge over the Standard version, especially since Wild decks are more powerful in general. But there are two cards that make it strong, maybe even broken. Deathlord and Velen’s Chosen. Let’s start with the first one. Deathlord – a 3-drop with 8 health. Yes, Humongous Razorleaf also has 8 health, but it can only be played in Silence Priest. And if you want to play Silence Priest, you need to run a lot of cards like Purify, Silence and Ancient Watcher. You can’t just add Razorleaf to your deck like that. But you can do that with the Deathlord. Making a huge body was never that easy. And you know what’s even better? That huge body has a Taunt. Which means that you don’t need Faceless Shambler in order to stop the Aggro decks. It might not seem like much, but it all frees so many slots. You can now play Zombie Chow to contest the early game better, you can play the Auchenai Soulpriest + Circle of Healing combo as your AoE of choice (it’s less consistent, but more powerful if you get both pieces – and getting both pieces is easier if you draw a lot like in this deck). Not to mention that Circle of Healing is good to heal up a minion before buffing it.

And then the Velen’s Chosen. The card was always good, but it’s even better right since a) you run the combo and b) you play Radiant Elemental. So not only you can play it for 2 mana, but if you keep your Radiant Elemental alive the deck becomes nearly unstoppable. Turn 4 Radiant Elemental + Power Word: Shield + Velen’s Chosen is often a game over. You make a 4/9 minion and if your opponent doesn’t kill it, he’s probably dead next turn, or at least close to being dead. You can easily Divine Spirit + Inner Fire it, maybe play something like Kabal Talonpriest and then punch the face for ~20 damage.

I’ve played the deck a bit in the lower ranks (I’m focusing in the Standard first) and haven’t dropped a single game yet. Even in the games that seemed impossible to win I’ve managed to pull off a miracle comeback each time. Now I wait for some Prophet Velen + Mind Blast Combo Priest list to be viable, as it was one of my favorite decks of all time.

P.S. I’ve decided to make a 3 Standard + 1 Wild split for now. Wild is getting more popular, especially with multiple streamers preparing for the upcoming tournament, but Standard is still the “main” game mode. Let me know what you think about it.

Closing


Do you know any fun/interesting decks that can also get you to high ranks? Some decks with non-meta choices, techs that you haven’t seen before etc.? If yes, let me know and I can include them next time! I hope that you’ve liked this batch of decks, I have played a few of those myself and I found them really cool. I’ll try my best to provide you with more fresh lists every now and then.

If you have any questions or suggestions, feel free to leave them in the comment section below. And if you want to be up to date with my articles, you can follow me on Twitter.

Good luck on the ladder and until next time!

The post Journey to Un’Goro Deck Recommendations #6 appeared first on Hearthstone Players.

Hearthstone Director Shares Initial Designs for Curse of Naxxramas Cards – PVP Live

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PVP Live

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Kotaku

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Touch Arcade

Latest ‘Hearthstone‘ Tavern Brawl Has You Discovering Cards from the Opponent’s Class
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Touch Arcade

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